assessment guidance specific to this module.

  

T‌‍‍‍‌‍‍‌‌‍‍‍‌‍‍‍‍‌‍‍he assignment Important These pages provide guidance on how to write your assignment. Please ensure you read all of this information right through until the checklist at the end. You should also make sure you have read the Assessment Guidance specific to this module. Additional support and guidance including advice on plagiarism, referencing and the marking system can be found in Social Sciences Assessment Information. These links direct you to Faculty policies on certain matters that you need to follow when you are writing your assignments.

Please consult your tutor if you are unsure about anything related to assessment, as failure to comply with relevant guidance could result in the loss of marks, or other penalties. Part 1: Essay (90 per cent of the mark for this assignment) Choose ONE of the following four options: Option A In addition to the theme of rights, how does either the theme of inequality or justice help us to understand the view that states are more effective than international organisations at managing common resources? Option B In addition to the theme of rights, how does either the theme of inequality https://weassistessays.com/discussion-post-6-make-sure-you-understand-how-bad-it-is-if-you-dont-cite-pl/ or justice help us to understand the claim that common resources are more likely to be sustainably managed by small communities than by competing individuals or by governments?

Option C In addition to the theme of justice, how does either the theme of inequality or rights help us to understand the view that ‘the treatment of migrants suggests that borders and injustice are closely linked.’? Option D In addition to the theme of justice, how does either the theme of inequality or rights help us understand the claim that ‘governmental regulations are necessary to achieve justice’? Word limit: 1500 words Part 2: Precis (10 per cent of the mark for this assignment) Write a precis of the essay you wrote for Part 1.

Word limit: 250 words What to submit for the EMA (in one file): a 1500-word essay (90 per cent of the mark) a 250-word precis (10 per cent of the mark). Student notes for Part 1 Part 1 requires you to demonstrate an ability to: construct and present social science arguments using appropriate concepts, models, theories and evidence select, interpret and use both quantitative and qualitative evidence, and an assessment of how data is constructed use examples, illustrations and case studies in presenting and assessing an argument integrate material from various sources. The EMA builds on the earlier skills you have developed in writing and planning your assignments. The main task is to integrate material that you drew on in either TMA 04 or TMA 05 (depending on the option that you choose) and link it to two of the three module themes of inequality, rights and justice. This means your essay should explain how your chosen module themes contribute to answering the question. You are encouraged to use your tutor’s feedback on TMA 04 or 05 to help you prepare for the EMA. However, bear in mind that the EMA task is broader than the tasks in TMA 04 and 05, and you will be marked on how well you address the question. Before beginning the assignment, ensure that you have worked through Week 27, ‘Preparing for the EMA’, which will help you to use feedback from previous TMAs to improve your EMA, as well as refresh your understanding of the module themes of justice, inequality and rights, and help you to bring them together in your essay. Information sources These information sources will help you to revise the module themes of inequality, rights and justice and are relevant to all four essay options. While your evidence and examples need to come from Blocks 3 and/or 4, you can draw on definitions and discussions of the module themes from across the module. https://convenienthomeworkhelpers.com/please-read-all-the-details-below-before-responding-to-assure-you-get-all-your/ Information source Summary Week 5 This week introduces the module theme of inequality, in particular showing the meaning of inequality in the home and global inequality. Week 11 Section 4 explains that inequality can be individual or group-based and discusses different forms of inequality and their intersections. Section 7 looks at income inequality and how this is evidenced and measured. Week 13 This week introduces the concept of rights. In particular, Section 7 looks at the rights of man and the vindication of the rights of women, as well as at the ideas of rights and responsibilities. Section 8 discusses the concept of human rights. Chapter 1 of Investigating the social world 2 includes a discussion of the contrasting concepts of human rights and property rights, and Rousseau’s idea of the social contract, which sees the individual and society as co-dependent. Week 18 This week reviews the discussion of rights in Block 3, including individual and property rights. Week 20 Section 7 discusses theories and concepts of justice. Chapter 6 of Investigating the social world 2 presents different theories of justice, drawing on John Rawls’ concept of the ‘veil of ignorance’ and Nancy Fraser’s concept of justice as requiring a global frame. Week 25 Section 4 reviews concepts of justice, in particular social justice, criminal justice, environmental justice and trade justice. Week 27 Section 4 provides links to the places in the module where the three DD103 themes are introduced and developed. This section also provides examples of how the module themes can be brought together. Information sources specific to Option A Information source Summary Week 14 This week provides a number of examples of environmental threat and the role of a growing environmental imagination in influencing state action to protect the environment. Greater environmental awareness is also linked to the formation and development of global monitoring and analysis of the environment through organisations such as the IPCC, which act as advisers to states. Week 15 This week introduces the concept of global governance and the role of states and state sovereignty in regulating common resources. It highlights a range of examples of both cooperation and conflict between states. It also offers useful material to help you assess how effectively, or not, states have operated in relation to common-resource protection and management. Weeks 13 and 18 The introductory and review weeks of Block 3 offer detailed explanations and examples of the theme of rights, and some useful content related to the block topic of common resources. Information sources specific to Option B Information source Summary Week 16 This week examines three alternative ways of managing common resources – via communal use, private ownership or state control – and empirical and theoretical arguments about which is best for economic development. It contains examples which support the argument that communal management of land can lead to its effective and sustainable exploitation, but also counter-examples where assigning rights of private ownership promotes more effective use of a resource for economic development. The use of theory and evidence are also discussed in this week. Week 17 This week provides several examples of indigenous people, and their experience with economic development when they were enabled to protect their communal lands or when those lands were switched to other forms of ownership and management. The Niyamgiri case provides a contrast between the Dongria Kondh (who successfully defended their rights to their sacred mountain against a mining company) and the lowland tribes whose defence was less successful. These and other cases (such as the Awa and Surui) allow consideration of how indigenous people’s right to economic development was affected by the successful or unsuccessful defence of communal lands against exercise of private property rights. Weeks 13 and 18 Both the introductory and review weeks provide some useful guidance on considering the module theme of rights and the block topic of common resources, both of which connect to this assignment question. The additional material on the Niyamgiri struggle in Week 18 will also be useful here. Information sources specific to Option C Information source Summary Week 21 This week provides an historical account of the creation of boundaries through the use of border control and immigration policy. It introduces a number of different case studies of immigration policies in action (in the USA, Mexico and the UK) and gives examples of how immigration policy can affect different groups of people in different ways. The usefulness and effectiveness of border control are also discussed, as well as the role of public opinion in shaping attitudes to immigration policy. Week 22 The content for this week extends the coverage of immigration policy by exploring how asylum seekers are treated within Europe (focusing mostly on the UK). The central focus of this week is on ‘crimmigration’ and the ways immigration policies have become increasingly punitive. It looks at the growth of immigration removal centres, considering the perspectives of migrants and their experiences of life within these centres. It highlights some sites of contestation in the use of immigration removal centres, and thus draws us back to consider the concept of justice in relation to detention. Weeks 20 and 25 The introductory and review weeks of Block 4 offer a detailed explanation and examples of boundaries, and some useful content related to the development of contemporary thinking about borders and justice. Information sources specific to Option D Information source Summary Week 23 This week’s material looks at how sound can be a physical and a symbolic boundary, as well as its place in everyday‌‍‍‍‌‍‍‌‌‍‍‍‌‍‍‍‍‌‍‍ life. Tranquillity, sound out of place and ‘noisy neighbours’ are discussed as case studies of the right to peace and quiet, and developed as instances of how environmental justice is sought after, negotiated and achieved in relation to sound and the law. ‘Zoning’ and ‘individualisation’ are explored as distinct strategies for managing sound. This week also provides useful Skills activities around debating issues of sound. Week 24 This week’s material looks at the difficulties of achieving trade justice and explores how the fair-trade movement, governments and think tanks have different ideas about how it can be achieved. This chapter explores the different strategies for achieving greater trade justice, including citizen-based approaches, state regulation and the advocacy of free trade. Weeks 20 and 25 Both the introductory and review weeks offer detailed explanation and examples of the ideas about justice, including helpful summaries of trade and environmental justice. Writing tips Before you begin writing your EMA, ensure that you have worked through Week 27, ‘Preparing for the EMA’, and the Skills activity in Week 15, ‘Understanding and using concepts’. This material will help you to bring together the different module themes in your assignment. There is no one right way of approaching the EMA, but you should keep in mind the following key points: While you are free to choose any of the four options, it makes sense for you to choose a question that you have already addressed in TMA 04 or TMA 05. You are encouraged to use your tutor’s feedback on TMA 04 and TMA 05 to develop your EMA answer. For example, if your tutor suggested that you engage more fully with a particular concept, or use more examples to support the points you make, the EMA provides a place for you to work on that. For TMA 04 and/or TMA 05 your tutor may have suggested more effective ways of structuring your answer or ensuring you address the essay question. This EMA gives you an opportunity to develop further your argument in TMA 04 or TMA 05, and therefore present an improved, as well as an extended, piece of work. However, the main requirement of the EMA is that you effectively bring together at least two of the three module themes of inequality, rights and justice to highlight how they are useful for understanding the area that your chosen question focuses on. It is possible to show how each module theme helps us to understand the essay question, by providing an example related to your chosen themes in turn. However, better answers may apply both module themes to one or two examples. It is entirely acceptable to draw on all three of the themes, but you are only required to draw on two of them for this EMA. To this end try to focus on using at least two of the themes in sufficient depth first and foremost, and ensure that using all three does not compromise your ability to achieve this. In answering the essay question you are encouraged to think critically about the different meanings and approaches to your chosen themes. For this purpose, you should aim to adopt an analytical approach to assessing how your chosen themes help us to understand aspects of the social world. This entails weighing up evidence, as well as considering different views on these themes. It is a good idea to use a range of evidence to support your argument. Good essays will use examples to show how the module themes help us to understand the social world. It is possible to achieve the highest marks by drawing on core module materials only. However, appropriate use of independent study materials will be rewarded. Good answers will be well-structured, clearly written and focus on the question. They will draw on appropriate examples and relevant evidence, and use concepts appropriately to come to a balanced and reasoned conclusion. Finally, remember to provide references for the sources you use, both in the body of your essay and in a reference list at the end of the essay. You should also include a word count. Your reference list at the end of the essay is not included in your word count. In Part 1 the EMA marker will be looking for you to: discuss how at least two of the three module themes of inequality, rights and justice help us to understand the social issue in your chosen essay question provide appropriate examples and evidence from Blocks 3 and/or 4 to address the essay question develop a social science argument, using appropriate concepts, theories and evidence integrate ideas from across the module and apply them to the examples you discuss in your essay provide an account which clearly extends the work of TMA 04 or TMA 05 and integrates two of the three themes in a meaningful way, and in broadly equal proportions, rather than simply making light reference to a theme additional to the one used in the earlier TMA present a structured and coherent argument in essay format, keep within the word limit and reference appropriately. Student notes for Part 2 Part 2 of the EMA consists of a precis of your essay for Part 1. Word limit: 250 words. Information sources Your essay in answer to Part 1 of this EMA. Writing tips A precis is a summary of the main points of your essay. It should not include your own thoughts or comments on the original text, though it may refer to key examples. Week 24, Section , explains how to write a precis. You have practised writing a precis as part of TMA 05, so use your tutor’s feedback for that TMA when you are writing the precis for the EMA. Ensure you make the improvements your tutor has suggested. Sections 3 and 5 of Week 27 provide guidance on learning from feedback and writing a precis. To write a good precis, you need to condense the main points and arguments of your essay into 250 words. You should carefully read through your essay, noting down the main points and your argument. Consider which points are more important than others and set them out clearly. In Part 2 the EMA marker will be looking for you to: concisely summarise the main points of your essay clearly set out the argument of your essay keep within the word limit of 250 words. Learning outcomes Elements of the following module learning outcomes are addressed by the EMA: Knowledge and understanding an understanding of the social sciences and their development through processes of evaluating questions and data, leading to readiness for study at level 2 an understanding of selected concepts, theories and debates within the social sciences generally, and with specialisation in the fields of economics, geography, politics and international relations, social policy and criminology, and sociology an understanding of the different processes and forces of social change, and the ways these are interpreted using the social sciences Cognitive skills an ability to construct and present social science arguments using appropriate concepts, models, theories and evidence an ability to select, interpret and use both quantitative and qualitative evidence, and an understanding of how data is constructed an ability to use examples, illustrations and case studies in presenting and assessing an argument, and an understanding of the use of abstraction and empirical investigation in this task an ability to compare and evaluate different theoretical positions or arguments and to apply social science concepts to real-world examples and cases Practical and professional skills an ability to engage with feedback received from previous work and reflect on own learning. Checklist Have I: Yes No Where can I look for guidance? looked at the feedback on my previous work? Your tutor’s comments on your TMAs will help you to develop and improve your skills for the EMA. Please pay particular attention to TMA 04 and TMA 05, as the feedback provided for these TMAs will be particularly relevant for completing the EMA. read all of the guidance notes for this assignment? Read through these assignment notes to check you have followed all the advice and instructions. written in my own words? Guidance on writing in your own words is available in Section , Skill: Understanding plagiarism and Section , Skill: Writing in your own words in Social Sciences Assessment Information. referenced my sources of evidence? Students receiving a good pass in the EMA will be expected to have referenced and cited sources within their essay and at the end of their essay in a complete and generally accurate manner. The following activities will help you to develop the skill of referencing: Week 3, Section 7, Skills: Writing in your own words using audio and video material Week 10, Section 11, Skills: Referencing textbooks Week 18, Section 9, Skills: Revisiting referencing. checked my word count? The guidance notes tell you the word limit for each part of the EMA. An answer that is shorter than the word limit by more than 10 per cent is likely to be too short to have fully answered the question. You must not exceed the word limit by more than 10 per cent. For further information on actions taken when word limits are exceeded, see Section 6 ‘Word length’ in Social Sciences Assessment Information. written the word count at the end of each part of my EMA? Check the word count and write that figure clearly at the end of each part of the assignment. completed each part of the EMA? The EMA has two separate elements: an essay and a precis. Both parts must be submitted together in one single file. Read through these assignment notes carefully to check you have followed al‌‍‍‍‌‍‍‌‌‍‍‍‌‍‍‍‍‌‍‍l the advice and instructions, and completed all the necessary tasks.

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